yahoosoccer:

Real Madrid wins its first trophy of the season — the UEFA Super Cup after beating Sevilla 2-0 — and it probably won’t be the Spanish giant’s last.

(Photos: Getty Images)

hepburnatheart:

beautyy

hepburnatheart:

beautyy

jdates:

INCREDIBLE

mattystanfield:

"My body. My pad. My ride. My family. My church. My boys. My girls. My porn."

Don Jon

Joseph Gordon-Levitt | 2013

Thomas Kloss | Cinematography

buttpoems:

a drawing about optimism

(via valactica)

(Source: tralielalie)

xitrus:

2 turnt 

xitrus:

2 turnt 

(Source: catholicnun, via werq-bitch816)

(Source: demonc0re, via valactica)

artphotocollector:

"What appears in the pictures was the subject’s decision, not mine. I took what they presented—delicate moments—unadorned and unglamorous, yet tender and exquisite. —Ray Metzker 

Belgium isn’t a land of sunshine and smiles, but there is a no-nonsense, hardworking attitude that I’ve always respected. It’s this commonsensical approach to life that I see in the work of Belgian photographer, Jacques Sonck, who is currently on exhibit at L. Parker Stephenson Photographs here in NYC. Sonck, who trained as a photographer, did the practical thing in life: he got a job shooting images at the Culture Department of the Province of Antwerp. For 35 years he photographed their exhibition catalogs and earned a living, while doing his own personal work on the side. 

Looking at his images, we can conjure the influences of Arbus and Penn, but Sonck’s images are not derivative. He is straightforward and unapologetic about what he’s doing. He’s a skilled photographer who has no personal interest, at all, in the lives of his sitters. Indeed, he often doesn’t even know their names. What he’s after is the transcendence found in any great portrait. That is, the notion that through the alchemy of photographer and subject, the photograph, itself, elevates their brief experience into something greater that we can engage and project ourselves onto. They are looking at us, we are looking at them, and we are all looking at each other. —Lane Nevares

sharontates:

Françoise Dorléac and Catherine Deneuve on the set of Les Demoiselles de Rochefort (1967)

sharontates:

Françoise Dorléac and Catherine Deneuve on the set of Les Demoiselles de Rochefort (1967)

hamorkj:

Happiness 

(Source: pakse, via low-end-tribe)

(Source: josepgabarros, via low-end-tribe)

themaninthegreenshirt:

Miles Davis takes a break under the marquee of the Cafe Bohemia in New York City, 1956.

themaninthegreenshirt:

Miles Davis takes a break under the marquee of the Cafe Bohemia in New York City, 1956.

(via xxrhian)